Thursday, March 20, 2008

Souffle, demystified

I need to remind myself more often that when I started this blog, I meant it to be a log for all the things I love to do. My creativity needs are constantly in a state of flux. Sometimes, it's all about the knitting, then the sewing, baking, cooking,reading, bookbinding, jewelry making etc,. But I usually just post about my knitting and sewing projects, and when I don't do any of these, you guys think I've fallen of the earth yet again. So, I'm going to post more about the many other things I enjoy doing besides stuff with needles and thread. Since the beginning of the year I've been really into trying new things in the baking department. I bake almost every weekend, mostly recipes I've been making for years already. It was time for something new, something a little challenging. I decided to make a souffle. The first time I've ever had a souffle was at a wonderful restaurant not far from SF called Manka's (which unfortunately burned down a year ago) and I still dream about it. It was savory with little bits of fresh asparagus throughout. Now, If you like to cook and read cooking mags and books, you've probably heard how difficult it is to make a souffle, how a drafty kitchen or opening your oven door can immediatley ruin it, or that it'll probably deflate the second you remove it from the oven before your guests have a chance to see it. I decided not to think about what could go wrong and just go for it. I made it for myself, so if it did turn out badly, it could just go straight to the green bin, no stress involved. I used this recipe from Gourmet magazine.


Meyer Lemon Souffle1
I opened the oven door twice to check on its progress, because the parchment paper collar was too high to see anything.
Meyer Lemon Souffle2
After I took it out of the oven, it stayed nice and fluffy for a photostuff until I attacked it with a spoon. It was light and fresh and airy, just perfect. The only change I made was using regular lemons instead of Meyers (to be honest, I'm not a big fan of Meyers...they have a peculiar taste. I prefer the tartness of regular lemons).
Btw, I'm blogging long distance. A week ago I decided spring break would be a fabulous time to go to Europe for cheap, so I'm enjoying Bavaria's cold and snowy capital right now, going to museums, eating, and eating some more. I'll be back in April, then I'll show you the sparkly skirt I made.

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wow! The souffle came out beautifully! Love how it looks so golden and delicous. Happy vacation! (ps-your prior post has inspired me to start on a couple of AB patterns :) Terry

Krawuggl said...

Mmmm, sieht das lecker aus! Absolut perfekt geworden, und ich bin sicher nicht nur fürs Foto shooting. Und alles mit Zitrone liebe ich sowieso. Ich würd mal gern mit dir in der Küche stehen und zugucken, da bin ich sicher könnt ich eine Menge lernen.
Viel Spaß und Freude in Bayern, viele liebe Grüße, Suzi
PS. Ich freu mich so!

peacockchic said...

Wow the souffle looks wonderful congrats on a spectacular baking adventure.

Speaking of adventures...have fun in Europe, can't wait to hear all about it!

whistlepeaknits said...

I've made a couple of souffles lately also and I've been surprised with how well they've turned out.

Have fun in Europe!

maritza said...

Good lord, that souffle looks amazing! Wow! Good on you, Steph! :)

Also, when you wrote, "I decided not to think about what could go wrong and just go for it." That is so brilliant and really could be applied to so many aspects of life.

Hope you are having a wonderful time in Bavaria.

Risa said...

Yum, yum, yum. that looks so good!
I think I know a bit of the sparkly skirt story. I'm looking forward to seeing it!

Seanna Lea said...

Beautiful souffle. The last time I had one it tasted very eggy. Did you find that you could taste a lot of egginess over the lemon?

Nonnahs said...

Enjoy the rest of your trip- it sounds wonderful! And the souffle looks delish!

seedless grape said...

Ooh--the souffle looks lovely! I've always wanted to try making souffle, but I don't have a souffle dish or ramekins. I will get them eventually . . .

I'm quite jealous of your Spring Break trip. Viel Spass!

WendyM said...

Great looking souffle, and I have always skipped over the recipes for the same reasons you mentioned. I'll have to get over it! I used to have a friend (guy) who was a whizz at whipping up a chocolate souffle very, very late at night after a long dinner party and they were always wonderful. Maybe the copious amounts of red wine helped?

li said...

Lovely souffle. I've always been to chicken to try my hand at making souffle, but they are my favorite desserts. Are you in Munich? Lucky!

MOONSTITCHES said...

Oh, das macht Appetit, sieht absolut koestlich aus!
When seeing souffles I always think of Audrey Hepburn / Sabrina... now I'd like to see the movie again :)
Post about wherever your crafty juices flow, I am looking forward reading about it all!

Katie said...

oh, that looks yummy! I love lemony things! I csn't wait to see that skirt.

Philippa said...

I'm so pleased you posted this, I love seeing all your crafty endeavours... I'm still hoping you'll post the recipe of your grandmother's apple cake, which looked so yum when you wrote about it ages ago!

Hope you are enjoying Germany, and being home - or at least, in one of your homes. Happy holidays, and happy crafting and cooking. Be well.

Carol said...

mmm, mouthwatering souffle! have you been to cafe jacqueline in north beach? all souffles, all delicious. but don't understand dislike of meyer lemons. hope you're having a lovely european spring break...vacation envy!

Poshyarns said...

Gorgeous souffle, lemon souffle is one of my favourite things in the world, heaven.

Nancy said...

The souffle will be starte today! Thanks for a fun blog read. You have an impressive blog, btw.

Anonymous said...

yummy.... Manka's did burn down, but they rebuilt it, and it's open again.